A CHALLENGE TO ACADEMIC GOVERNANCE IN COMMUNITY COLLEGES: CHANGES IN FACULTY INVOLVEMENT THROUGH COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENTS

Author(s): TANGMAN, RUTH STRONG Degree: ED.D. Year: 1998 Pages: 00133 Institution: THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO; 0142 Advisor: Adviser: BREDA BOVA Source: DAI, 59, no. 11A, (1998): 4026

 

Abstract: This replication study systematically analyzed the content of 68 community college collective bargaining agreements in effect in 1995 and compared those data with comparable analyses of 1975 and 1985 by Dr. Gwen B. Williams (1987). Therefore, the study provides longitudinal analyses that reflect the experience of community colleges with a minimum of twenty years experience in contract negotiations. The data collected and analyzed for this study supported the major hypothesis that the 1995 CBAs would have provisions for higher levels of faculty involvement than the 1975 and 1985 contracts in three of the areas Dr. Williams studied: teaching load, non-teaching responsibilities, and academic functions. 1995 CBAs were anticipated to have lower levels of faculty involvement in employment decisions; however, the study found that the trend of increased faculty involvement continued in that area as well. Application of the contract content analysis system, developed by Dr. Gwen Williams, (score 04 for 18 selected academic items) resulted in the recommendation that the system should be modified to include additional definitions of terms and would be strengthened by adding additional thematic units appropriate to changes in the community college environment that have occurred in academic governance during recent decades. The study suggests that administrators must understand that there is a trend for faculty collective bargaining agreements to include governance issues that affect the ability of community colleges to thrive in the future. The results further suggest that unions and faculty may want to consider that issues beyond traditional compensation items can be negotiated to secure an appropriate professional relationship in matters affecting their ability to teach and serve students.